Go to Mid Coast Hospital Home Page
Clinical Services Wellness Doctors Patients & Visitors Careers Volunteer About Giving Find Us
Our free e-Newsletter
Newsletters Family of Services Mid Coast Hospital Search Site Map Contact Us
Mid Coast Center for Community Health & Wellness Newsletter
May 2018
Subscribe to our e-newsletter

Suicide and the Seasons

Suicide and the Seasons

The weather is becoming warmer and the days longer. Spring is finally here. Although the long, cold winter looks to be behind us, the risk of someone we know dying by suicide actually increases.

It is a myth that more individuals die by suicide during the winter months than the spring season. Folk wisdom links winter with suicide, noting that depressive symptoms can be exacerbated by the cold, dark days. Similarly, another myth points to holidays where those struggling can feel left out of the cheer.

But contrary to these thoughts, studies dating back to the 1800s through the late 1990s show that suicides are actually lowest in the winter months. In fact, suicide rates peak during the spring.

There are many theories as to why suicides increase in the warmer months. Perhaps it is the social pressure individuals feel when the weather warms and they expect their moods to increase, but they do not bounce back like they expect they will. The social explanation suggests people who are vulnerable to suicidal behavior face more challenges when the weather warms and social interaction increases. Alternatively, people who are struggling may feel left out of social engagements; essentially, they feel that the isolation of winter withdraws for everyone except for them.

A second theory pertains to inflammation and environmental irritants, such as pollen. Inflammation is linked to Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, heart disease, and other conditions. Depression, suicidal thoughts, and behaviors have long been linked to inflammation. Tree pollen and lingering winter cold and flu seasons have also been known to increase inflammation during spring months.

The connection between suicide and the seasons is complex. However, regardless of the season, mental health concerns are treatable and help is available. If you are concerned about yourself or someone you know, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 800-273-8255 or visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

Calendar Highlights
Summer Meditation Series
Aug 24, 2022
Youth Mental Health First Aid Training
Sep 20, 2022
Calendar Highlights
Summer Meditation Series
Aug 24, 2022
Youth Mental Health First Aid Training
Sep 20, 2022
<< Previous Article
Dementia Caregiver Stress
 
 
FOLLOW:
Mid Coast Hospital - For a Lifetime of Caring
123 MEDICAL CENTER DRIVE
BRUNSWICK, MAINE 04011
Copyright © 2022. Mid Coast Hospital.
All rights reserved.
 

RESOURCES

EDUCATION & SUPPORT GROUPS
QUALITY & SAFETY
OUR DOCTORS
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
PAY ONLINE
CAFE MENU
TOWNS SERVED
CONTACT US

MENU

HOMEPAGE
CLINICAL SERVICES
DOCTORS
WELLNESS
PATIENTS & VISITORS

CAREERS
VOLUNTEER
ABOUT US
GIVING
FIND US
SITE INDEX
PRIVACY PRACTICES

Mid Coast Hospital - For a Lifetime of Caring

123 Medical Center Drive, Brunswick, Maine 04011
(207) 373-6000 | Directions

Copyright © 2022. Mid Coast Hospital. All rights reserved.

Accredited by The Joint Commission. Recognized as
a Magnet™ Hospital for exceptional nursing and patient care by the American Nurses Credentialing Center.
Magnet Recognized Seal
Learn more about Quality & Safety.